MORE DETAIL ABOUT CEMETERY IMAGES FROM 1900

 As mentioned in the previous post, the three images date from March 1900 and now reside within the restored Caretaker’s Lodge where the Mound City National Cemetery Preservation Commission maintains its headquarters and a history display. Click here to visit the MCNPC website.

OLD-PHOTOGRAPHS

These are two images of the cemetery taken in the spring 1900. Please refer to previous post for more information.

I took the picture on the right without any consideration of the 1900 image.

CARETAKERS-LODGE

The lodge as it appeared in March 1900. The Mound City National Cemetery Preservation Commission maintains a history display in the restored lodge.

 Once the image was scanned, I was able to zoom into the background and pull out this detail. The sign next to the door says “Superintendent’s Office.”  Today the room is used as the above mentioned history display for the MCNC Preservation Commission.  This makes perfect sense given the layout of the building. The room extends at a right angle from what was the living quarters. The staircase is not accessible from the “office”.

This close up was taken from the caretaker's lodge front porch, just to the right of the front door.

This close up was taken from the caretaker’s lodge front porch, just to the right of the front door.
We already know the images date from 1900. But there’s another detail helps us pinpoint the date. The Office of the Quartermaster General adopted the first stone markers in 1873.  They were only 12 inches tall and 10 inches wide. These images feature those first stone designs. 
HEADSTONE

Only three years later, in 1903, the government authorized to increase the headstone  in size to 39 inches and 12 inches wide. This design is known as the “Civil War” type.

Two examples of the "Civil War" type headstones at the Mound City National Cemetery.

Two examples of the "Civil War" type headstones at the Mound City National Cemetery.

After World War I, a marble design 42 inches long and 13 inches wide was adopted. This design is referred to as the “general” type.

 GENRAL-TYPE

If you’re interested to know more, please click on this link to the National Cemetery Administration and its page about the history of military headstones.

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